Posted in 2015-2016 Club, Not Mock Newbery

The Year we Sailed the Sun, by Theresa Nelson

Summary:  In St. Louis, Missouri, in 1911, orphaned eleven-year-old Julia Delaney rails against countless disappointments and the nun’s strict rules at the House of Mercy, especially after her sister Mary turns fourteen and must leave, but she, her family, and best friend get tangled up with a gangster and a decade-old mystery.

Atheneum

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Posted in 2014-2015 Club, Not Mock Newbery

Copper Magic, by Julia Mary Gibson

Summary:  The year is 1906, and twelve-year-old Violet Blake unearths an ancient talisman–a copper hand–beside the stream where her mother used to harvest medicine. Violet’s touch warms the copper hand and it begins to reveal glimpses of another time. Violet is certain that the copper hand is magic–and if anyone is in need of its powers, it’s Violet. Surely the magic of the copper hand can make things right for Violet and restore her fractured family. Violet makes a wish. But her ignorant carelessness unleashes formidable powers–and her attempts to control them jeopardizes not only herself, but the entire town of Pigeon Harbor.

Tom Doherty Books

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Posted in 2012-2013 Club, Not Mock Newbery

Abraham Lincoln & Frederick Douglass: the story behind an American friendship, by Russell Freedman

Summary:  Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass were both self-taught, both great readers and believers in the importance of literacy, both men born poor who by their own efforts reached positions of power and prominence–Lincoln as president of the United States and Douglass as the most famous and influential African American of his time. Though their meetings were few and brief, their exchange of ideas helped to end the Civil War, reunite the nation, and abolish slavery.

Clarion

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Posted in 2011-2012 Club, Not Mock Newbery

Flesh and Blood So Cheap: the Triangle Fire and its Legacy, by Albert Marrin

Summary:  Provides a detailed account of the disastrous Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City, which claimed the lives of 146 garment workers in 1911, and examines the impact of this event on the nation’s working conditions and labor laws.

Alfred A Knopf

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