Posted in 2015-2016 Club, Not Mock Newbery

How to Speak Dolphin, by Ginny Rorby

Summary: Since her mother died, twelve-year-old Lily has struggled to care for her severely autistic half-brother, Adam, in their Miami home, but she is frustrated and angry because her oncologist step-father, Don, expects her to devote her time to Adam, and is unwilling to admit that Adam needs professional help–but when Adam bonds with a young dolphin with cancer Lily is confronted with another dilemma: her family or the dolphin’s freedom.

Scholastic

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One thought on “How to Speak Dolphin, by Ginny Rorby

  1. “How to Speak Dolphin”, written by Ginny Rorby and published by Scholastic Press, is about 12-year-old Lily and her severely autistic half-brother, Adam. Lily’s stepfather expects her to care for her half-brother, and she feels that this fact is contributing to her lack of friends and inability to invite people over. Lily also thinks that her stepfather won’t acknowledge that Adam needs professional help. But when they start using Dolphin-Assisted Therapy, (DAT) her stepfather feels they are getting results and that this is good for Adam, but Lily dislikes how the dolphin is kept in captivity and wants to help get her back into the ocean, where she really belongs.
    I felt that this book was very well written, and the characters were pretty good. The plot felt kind of typical, only because other books these days are about autistic children, so I was a little unsure about it, but when I read this story, I didn’t want to stop. For me, every page turn was exciting, and I was frequently thinking, “What’s gonna happen next?”
    One of the things I liked was how Lily’s emotions changed with her stepfather–Sometimes she would be pretty calm, too scared to argue with him, but other times she would actually get pretty sassy! It reminded me of how I sometimes am with my own father, which was one of the reasons the book “spoke to me” often.
    I believe this book is good for ages 8-12, or 4th-6th graders.

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